Menu
Home Page

Appendix 4

Appendix 4: Health Education per year group

Year 1

  • that there is a normal range of emotions and scale of emotions that all humans experience in relation to different experiences and situations.
  • how and when to seek support including which adults to speak to in school if they are worried about their health.
  • about personal hygiene and germs including bacteria, viruses, how they are spread and treated, and the importance of handwashing. (Link to Covid as this is relevant at the moment. Discuss especially the reasons for washing hands after using the toilet and before preparing food/eating.)
  • develop skills for maintaining personal hygiene, cleaning teeth, washing hands
  • be motivated to be clean and healthy
  • where and how to report concerns and get support with issues online. (Real-life and online.)
  • that bullying (including cyberbullying) has a negative and often lasting impact on mental wellbeing.

Year 2

  • that there is a normal range of emotions and scale of emotions that all humans experience in relation to different experiences and situations.
  • how and when to seek support including which adults to speak to in school if they are worried about their health.
  • the importance of sufficient good quality sleep for good health and that a lack of sleep can affect weight, mood and ability to learn. (If we are tired, it stops us feeling healthy and we cannot focus on tasks.)
  • the importance of building regular exercise into daily and weekly routines and how to achieve this. (Important to keep our heart healthy as well as our mind. Make links to lack of exercise during lockdown and mental health.)
  • that some substances can be harmful. (Eg, household substances, etc. Even medicines can be dangerous – discuss how and why.)

Year 3

  • what constitutes a healthy diet.
  • the principles of planning and preparing a range of healthy meals.
  • the characteristics of a poor diet and risks associated with unhealthy eating.
  • about dental health, including regular check-ups at the dentist.
  • the facts about legal and illegal harmful substances and associated risks, eg, smoking, alcohol, drug-taking.
  • that mental wellbeing is a normal part of daily life, in the same way as physical health.
  • how to recognise and talk about their emotions and their own and others’ feelings.
  • that bullying has a negative and often lasting impact on mental wellbeing.

Year 4

  • the facts about legal and illegal harmful substances and associated risks, including smoking, alcohol use and drug-taking. (Focus on smoking and alcohol use – why do people smoke and drink alcohol? What are the potential risks?)
  • about safe and unsafe exposure to the sun, and how to reduce the risk of sun damage, including skin cancer. (Make explicit the need to cover up in the sun, and the importance of wearing a high factor sun block.)
  • about personal hygiene and germs including bacteria, viruses, how they are spread and treated, and the importance of handwashing. (Make links to Covid and the importance of washing hands after using the toilet. Also include the importance of washing/bathing daily as their bodies are developing.)
  • about dental health and the benefits of good oral hygiene and dental flossing, including regular check-ups at the dentist. (Remind the children that if they don’t look after their adult teeth, they don’t get a third set.)
  • the characteristics of a poor diet and risks associated with unhealthy eating. (Look at illnesses such as rickets, diabetes, obesity which are all associated with a poor diet.)
  • the risks associated with an inactive lifestyle (including obesity). (Look at the effects on your heart in particular.)
  • the facts about legal and illegal harmful substances and associated risks, including smoking, alcohol use and drug-taking. (Focus on prescribed medication – discuss that these are legal when prescribed by a doctor/pharmacist. Why we should not share prescribed medication.)
  • the characteristics and mental and physical benefits of an active lifestyle. (Look at how a healthy lifestyle can positively impact on our mental and physical wellbeing.)
  • the importance of sufficient good quality sleep for good health and that a lack of sleep can affect weight, mood and ability to learn.

Year 5

  • that bullying (including cyberbullying) has a negative and often lasting impact on mental wellbeing.
  • that for most people the internet is an integral part of life and has many benefits. (Benefits which makes life easier for us.)
  • about the benefits of rationing time spent online, the risks of excessive time spent on electronic devices and the impact of positive and negative content online on their own and others’ mental and physical wellbeing. (Encourage them to limit their online time.)
  • why social media, some computer games and online gaming, for example, are age restricted. (Look at PEGI ratings.)
  • the facts about legal and illegal harmful substances and associated risks, including smoking, alcohol use and drug-taking. (Focus on illegal drugs, glue sniffing, etc.)
  • how to recognise early signs of physical illness, such as weight loss, or unexplained changes to the body. (Signs that you should see a doctor.)
  • about safe and unsafe exposure to the sun, and how to reduce the risk of sun damage, including skin cancer. (Also include the risks of sun beds for skin cancer.)
  • the importance of building regular exercise into daily and weekly routines and how to achieve this, eg, walking or cycling to school, a daily active mile, vigorous exercise. (Look at the negative effects of being inactive.)
  • the risks associated with an inactive lifestyle (including obesity). (Effects on our mental and physical health.)
  • key facts about puberty and the changing adolescent body, particularly from age 9 through to age 11, including physical and emotional changes. (Separate boys and girls learn about the changes to their own gender’s bodies.)
  • about menstrual wellbeing including the key facts about the menstrual cycle. (Girls only in Y5.)
  • Know the correct names and terms for private body parts.
  • how to judge whether what they are feeling and how they are behaving is appropriate and proportionate.
  • simple self-care techniques, including the importance of rest, time spent with friends and family and the benefits of hobbies and interests.
  •  
  • where and how to seek support (including recognising the triggers for seeking support) including whom in school they should speak to if they are worried about their own or someone else’s mental wellbeing or ability to control their emotions (including issues arising online.) (No shame in asking for help.)
  • it is common for people to experience mental ill health. For many people who do, the problems can be resolved if the right support is made available, especially if accessed early enough. (Who can help us?)

Year 6

  • how to consider the effect of their online actions on others and know how to recognise and display respectful behaviour online and the importance of keeping personal information private. (Include cyberbullying, stalking, identity theft, etc.)
  • that the internet can also be a negative place where online abuse, trolling, bullying and harassment can take place, which can have a negative impact on mental health. (Also include photoshopping and celebrities who have been trolled.)
  • where and how to report concerns and get support with issues online.
  • how to make a clear and efficient call to emergency services if necessary.
  • concepts of basic first-aid, for example, dealing with common injuries, including head injuries.
  • how to be a discerning consumer of information online including understanding that information, including that from search engines, is ranked, selected and targeted.
  • the facts about legal and illegal harmful substances and associated risks, including smoking, alcohol use and drug-taking. (Focus on illegal drugs, glue sniffing, etc and potential links to crime, eg, county lines.)
  • how to recognise early signs of physical illness, such as weight loss, or unexplained changes to the body. (Signs that you should see a doctor. also discuss, eg, bulimia, anorexia and other dangerous eating disorders.)
  • the facts and science relating to allergies, immunisation and vaccination. (Make links through science as well as to Covid 19.)
  • the benefits of physical exercise, time outdoors, community participation, voluntary and service-based activity on mental wellbeing and happiness. (Important to look after our physical and mental health.)
  • isolation and loneliness can affect children and that it is very important for children to discuss their feelings with an adult and seek support. (Make links to Covid and lockdown.)
  • where and how to seek support (including recognising the triggers for seeking support) including whom in school they should speak to if they are worried about their own or someone else’s mental wellbeing or ability to control their emotions (including issues arising online.) (No shame in asking for help.)
  • it is common for people to experience mental ill health. For many people who do, the problems can be resolved if the right support is made available, especially if accessed early enough. (Who can help us?)
  • key facts about puberty and the changing adolescent body, particularly from age 9 through to age 11, including physical and emotional changes. (Separate boys and girls learn about the changes to the other gender’s bodies.)
  • about menstrual wellbeing including the key facts about the menstrual cycle. (Boys and girls separately in Y6.)
  • Know the correct names and terms for private body parts.

Year 6 also have the opportunity to take part in a sex education session where they learn how babies are made and born.

  • how babies are conceived using an egg from a female and sperm from a male
  • a man’s penis is inserted into a woman’s vagina and this is how the sperm connects with the egg
  • the baby grows and develops in the mother’s womb
  • that babies are usually delivered through the mother’s vagina but sometimes are born using a caesarian section
  • the reason we all go through puberty is to enable us to reproduce as adults

Parents can withdraw their child from this session. The children are separated into girls and boys. Questions are answered truthfully but in an age-appropriate manner. No videos or photographs are used which depicts any sexual act.

Top